Welcome

Award-winning Civil War Fiction, Civil War Novels

Michael J. Roueche, Author, Civil War Fiction

Near Devil’s Head Fire Lookout Tower in Colorado. The trail to the tower is a great family hike, and you’re rewarded with spectacular views of the Front Range, Denver, the high plains and an unbroken horizon.

Thank you for visiting. I write Civil War novels meant to be fun reads with plots that fit in historically accurate settings. While I include a few battle scenes and sneak in a few war facts, I balance them with heavy doses of adventure, romance and enough trials to challenge even the most tenacious character.

I also blog, writing about anything that catches my interest (except politics)—including the Civil War; exploring the natural beauty and animal life in Colorado (where we now live); and my current personal effort to read all of Shakespeare by April 2014 (anniversary of his reputed 450th birthday).

I am honored to have received the John Esten Cooke Fiction Award for Southern History in 2012 for Beyond the Wood

We’ve just published A River Divides, the second book in the Beyond the Wood series. (Everyone assures me it’s very late, but I wanted to get it right.) The series will be at least a trilogy, perhaps with a short prequel on a favorite Beyond the Wood character.

My venture in writing began unexpectedly at the intersection of three experiences:

    • Over a several-year time period, I had been reading extensively about the Civil War.
    • At the same time, a friend randomly handed me a replica of a Virginia Militia uniform button, insisting that I keep it. (You can see a photo of the button on the spine and back cover of Beyond the Wood.)
    • And finally, during a spur-of-the-moment drive toward Virginia’s Manassas National Battlefield Park, we met a man just outside the park. He was missing a leg—reminding me instantly of Confederate General Richard S. Ewell who lost a leg at the battle at Brawner’s Farm, prelude to Second Bull Run. Brawner’s Farm is included in the Manassas park. Meeting the man was an interesting coincidence, not extraordinary. But the man’s sudden disappearance was. (Yes, I’ve since figured out how it could have happened.)

The outline for the story of Beyond the Wood came to me at the moment our new friend disappeared.

I hope you enjoy the books and thanks for your support.

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